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20130215
20130215
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the subcommittee. i am looking forward to working with the ranking members as we both share a commitment to u.s. border security and ensuring our board agents -- ensuring our border agents receive the support they need to protect homeland. also look forward to a strong bipartisan cooperation in helping to make the department of home as security as efficient and effective as possible. i would also like to introduce our new freshmen majority members. we have mr. richard hudson of north carolina. later joining us will be stephen from montana. they bring a welcome experience to their new roles in congress and the subcommittee. i look for to leveraging their experience and knowledge to provide effective oversight of hds. -- of dhs. i think the subcommittee staffer diligently working together to put this hearing together. thank you for that. i now recognize myself for an opening statement. next month marks 10 years since the creation of the dhs with the homeless security act of 2001. the attacks on september 11 forced to rethink our approach to defining the homeland. as the commission report document
'm looking forward to working with the ranking member ron barber as we both share a strong commitment to u.s. border security and ensuring our border agents receive the support that they need to protect the homeland. last september, ron and i attended the dedication ceremony of the bryant a kerry border patrol station in arizona on wrangled patrol agent brian terry who was killed in december 2010 in the line of duty in arizona. also look forward to a strong bipartisan cooperation in helping to make the department of homeland security as efficient and effective as possible. i would also like to introduce our new freshman majority members. today we have mr. kief rothfuss from pennsylvania and mr. richard hudson of north carolina, and later joining us will be mr. steven gaines of montana. they bring a wealth of experience to their new roles in the congress and on the subcommittee at a look forward to leveraging their experience and knowledge to provide effective oversight of dhs. let me pause for just a minute and think the subcommittee staff who have worked diligently to put this first hearing
's department is making another pitch to buy and use unmanned aerial droughns. jodi hernandez joins us this evening from oakland with the details. >> the alameda county sheriff's department could become the first agency in the state to deploy droughns. the debate took center stage at a board of supervisors committee meeting here today. civil rights advocates hope to ground the proposal before it has a chance to take off. >> you're looking at the 4.4 pound aerial droerngs the alameda county sheriff's department wants to buy it. the drone or what the sheriff calls a small unmanned aerial system would be used to give officers a bird's eye view at crime scenes and search and rescue operations. >> these things have a 25-minute capability flight time. so for 25 minutes, to search areas for lost children or elderly or alzheimer's patients, to search an area that would be very difficult. >> these devices -- >> but as the sheriff's department made the pitch to members of the board of supervisors, public protection committee, critics wearing no drone stickers filled the room to voice their conce
's emergency broadcast systems. just as they used to do with far simpler traffic signs. the zombie debate in canada's house had members laughing. but, wait, zombie apocalypse training has been canceled. the new scenario will simulate flooding. flooding? yep. all the joshing about zombies had quebec's government worried the training exercise would lose its serious focus. >> under the leadership of this prime minister, canada will never become a safe haven for zombies ever. >> here here. >> reporter: canada has nothing to fear. as one guy posted on gawker, zombies are allergic to maple syrup. jeanne moos -- >> to the zombie apocalypse. >> reporter: -- cnn -- >> canada will never become a safe haven for zombies ever. >> here here. >> reporter: new york. >> that's so silly. that's it for me. i'm suzanne malveaux. "cnn newsroom" continues now with brooke baldwin. >>> happy friday. i woke up in mobile, alabama, talking to cruise ship passengers and right now i am back at cnn world headquarters in atlanta because if you watch the show enough you know i am a space geek and we are minutes away fro
it in perspective for you, and it could enter the path some of satellites. what won't happen, nasa assures us, is this asteroid and, oh, yes, it has a name, called da 14, they say it will not hit earth. still, you cannot ignore the buzz around this out of this world event. so we have this whole team of reporters for you and analysts to bring you this historic moment. we have a so-called asteroid hunter, former astronaut, coming on live this hour and next to talk about really what will be a historic moment as 2012 da-14 brushes by us earthlings. that will start just about ten minutes from now. right now, i want to go straight to casey wian, live in pasadena, california, nasa's jet propulsion laboratory. and i imagine the excitement is palpable. they're tracking the asteroid. tell me where it is now. >> reporter: well, it is over australia, brooke. they are very excited here at jpl. it is a very, very big day. they have been tracking this asteroid for nearly a year. today is the day it is going to get closest it is going to come to the earth as you mentioned, 17,200 miles. and right now, it is
field. it passed, we can happily report, without incident. here to tell us about both events is astrophysicist and author neil degrasse tyson, director of the hayden planetarium in new york city. let's start with what happened in russia. how unusual was that in terms of size and impact? >> well, we couldn't know precisely how common that would be. all we can do is sort of look back at other sort of reported such events. for example, there was an air blast that happened in the airspace over india and pakistan back in 1990s. which happened to occur while they were in intense conversations about their nuclear buildup of arm ament. and so such a blast mimics greatly what would happened with the nuclear blast. it is an instant deposit of energy in the atmosphere. and so forth nationally we were able to tell them, we, i mean people, my scientific brethren who study this, were able to tell them no, that was not somebody's first strike it was actually a cosmic event. so that was in the 1990s. and if this had happened over the pas civic, nobody would have noticed. >> is it, in fact ha
an asteroid out there, not going to hit us, just give us a close shave in 20 to 25 minutes. this is an asteroid about 150 feet in diameter will miss earth by only 17,000 miles. cosmiccally speaking, that's very close, closer to us than some of our own satellites. >> its proximity and its size, it will still appear probably as a little dot of light moving against the background of the stars. so even in this big powerful telescope, we're not going to have such a close view of this object that you might see it shape. we might see a change in brightness of this object if it's rotating as it moves across the sky. >> astronomers here at the chabot space center in oakland where i'm at right now will be keeping an eye on this when it comes into view tonight. they're part of a special network of observatories collecting and data. they'll have a viewing party here inside their large 36-inch reflector telescope room, which you can see right there. this will be between 7:30 and 10:30 tonight. it is free and open to the public. i have such great faith in our astronomers that i can say t
promoting his new book, the house of rain. we also want to thank the publishers for bringing craig to us and we also want to thank (inaudible) at the book table at the end of the program. craig childs is a commentator for national public radio's morning edition. he has written noert "new york times", the los angeles times and several magazines. his work has won the spirit of the west award as well as the colorado book award. the book, house of rain, is craig's latest book. please help me welcome craig childs. . >> hello. i come to you from out of the desert. i'm coming to you from a landscape where once you get an eye for things, 3 grains of sand out of place draw your attention, where everything is brought to bear, where everything is hinged to a story, every drop of rain leaving a dimple in the ground. stories are everywhere out in this landscape. when you walk down into the bottom of the narrow canyons made of sandstone and you put your hands on the sand stone faces and the smooth shallow scallops that look like champagne glasses, you can feel the shape of the last flood that came thr
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)